Dominion of New York



Politics

January 3, 2012
 

Why I Cursed Rick Santorum Out and You Should Too

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Written by: Kelly Virella
R

ick Santorum has fired the latest volley in the desperate attempts of some Republican primary candidates and candidate-wannabes to out-racist each other.

What really pisses me off about Santorum’s remarks is that they presume something really dangerous: a passive, docile, nearly invisible, isolated and powerless black electorate.

First, Donald Trump committed political suicide by questioning Obama’s birth certificate and insinuating that Obama wasn’t smart enough to be admitted to Columbia and Harvard.

Then, Newt bent over backwards to stick his head into his anus, saying that poor black children who live in communities with no habits of working should become janitors in their schools, so as to avoid becoming pimps, prostitutes or drugdealers.

Along the way, it resurfaced that Ron Paul or his ghost writer dedicated the ’90s to creating newsletters stereotyping black men as fleet-of-foot criminals. And he himself said he would have opposed the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Now — not to be outdone by other white supremacists without hoods — Rick Santorum came along Sunday in Sioux City, Iowa trying to revive the image of the black Welfare Queen. “I don’t want to make black people’s lives better by giving them someone else’s money,” he said. “I want to give them the opportunity to go out and earn their money.” Sure you do, Rick.

Of course, we all know that Rick Santorum will never make anyone’s life better — black, white, Asian, Native American or in between — because he’ll never be President. Even Republicans just wish he’d go away, wasting their time at the debates, by sharing his “ideas.”

And of course many unemployed black people want jobs. So it’s not his purported desire to create some — ostensibly for black people — that I quibble with.

The problem — in my view — is not even his mis-identification of welfare as black. By now, anyone who reads anything — and that apparently excludes the woman in Santorum’s Iowa audience who nodded her head in agreement with his remarks — knows that most welfare recipients are white. Nor do I want to criticize the use of race-baiting to confuse poor whites about who their enemy is. Been there, done that. And it’s been more eloquently denounced by poor whites themselves.

What really pisses me off about Santorum’s remarks is that they presume something dangerous: a docile, nearly invisible, isolated and powerless black electorate. If we were visible to him and mattered to him, he would have taken the time to talk to us directly about creating jobs. Instead, he takes a cheap shot at us, assuming that we have no power to fight back. Only in his dreams!

We’re not the Civil Rights or Black Power generation, but we’re here and ready to be marshaled for a fight in a moment’s notice. Our communication networks are stronger than ever. We are more politically educated than ever. And we have more non-black allies than ever. It’s time for you to accept the 2008 election, Rick. White folks voted for Obama too.

It’s more likely than not that Santorum’s political career is a tiny, but annoying bur inside America’s shoe and will be tossed off when we take off our socks. But for good measure this morning, I removed my kid gloves and sent him a Tweet that says I’m ready for battle.

I urge you to send him a strongly-worded message too.

If he and others like him keep bringing it to our door, they will get the political ass-whipping they’re asking for. And given what a tinder box the country is today, they may get more than an election defeat. Taking a page from a movement that our parents and grandparents created, Occupy Wall Street has already clashed with police and is physically standing its ground. Don’t think for a second, that we’re not ready to do what needs to be done.



About the Author

Kelly Virella
Kelly Virella lives in an East Harlem walk-up with her husband, her bicycle and her books. She's worked as a journalist for 11 years and started this website during the summer of 2011. She fell in love with New York City during her first visit here as a 16-year-old and finally made good on her promise to move here in April 2010.



 
 

 
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